Snopes Hits Back at Babylon Bee’s Lawyering Up

Rachel S

You may remember the article I wrote about Babylon Bee having had enough of Snope’s “fact checking” partisanship. In case you missed it, the Christian- and conservative-leaning satire site has been faced with blatantly biased and inappropriately accusatory “fact checking” from Snopes. So they lawyered up and let Snopes know.

Snopes decided not to take it sitting down, and published a report about how satire is understood by readers.

The truth is, understanding online political satire isn’t easy. Many satirical websites mimic the tone and appearance of news sites. You have to be familiar with the political issue being satirized. You have to understand what normal political rhetoric looks like, and you have to recognize exaggeration. Otherwise, it’s pretty easy to mistake a satirical message for a literal one.

Not to be ableist, or whatever, but it is easy if you have half a functioning brain. If you read a headline from the Babylon Bee or the Onion and think it’s real, you deserve to be made fun of a little.

But Snopes has a graph, so you know it’s real science™. But. . . there’s a problem (obviously).

Did Snopes NOT just say that you have to know what to look for with satire? And then completely remove the context, exaggeration, jargon, and phrasing that helps us recognize satire for what it is??? Give me a break.

Paul Bois said it best: “Snopes [justified] its attack on the Bee by suggesting that Republicans are too stupid to know the difference between fake news and satire.”

Of course, reactions to this weird vendetta that Snopes has against the Bee were as hilarious as you’d expect. My personal favorite was collective COTR crush Dan Crenshaw’s, who tweeted:

But, in true form, Babylon Bee said it best.