Police Asked to Leave Starbucks for Making Guest Feel “Unsafe”

Rachel S

Remember when morality was invented and they decided to make whatever was trendy the yardstick for measuring appropriate behavior and how to treat people?

Yeah, me neither.

But regardless, that’s where we seem to find ourselves in 2019, when police officers can be asked to leave a public building because another customer “did not feel safe.”

The terrifying officers in question, one of whom was a regular at this Tempe, Arizona Starbucks location, were engaged in the threatening and violent act of. . . standing and sipping a cup of coffee, before starting their shift.

No information was given regarding the barista who made the request that the police either leave the establishment or at least “move out of the complaining customer’s line of sight” or said complaining customer. The matter is being looked into by Starbucks, and the Tempe Officers Association shared the following statement:

Yesterday, on Independence Day, six Tempe police officers stopped by the Starbucks at Scottsdale Road and McKellips for coffee. The officers paid for their drinks and stood together having a cup of coffee before their long 4th of July shift. They were approached by a barista, who knew one of the officers by name, because he is a regular at that location. The barista said that a customer “did not feel safe” because of the police presence. The barista asked the officers to move out of the customer’s line of sight or to leave.

Disappointed, the officers did in fact leave.

This treatment of public safety workers could not be more disheartening. While the barista was polite, making such a request at all was offensive. Unfortunately, such treatment has become all too common in 2019.

We know this is not a national policy at Starbucks Corporate and we look forward to working collaboratively with them on this important dialogue.

I personally preferred their first tweet:

And, if I may be completely honest, I appreciate having a reason to avoid Starbucks that’s more morally aligned than “their coffee is garbage.”

Look, I’m not going to try to suggest that there are no problems with police forces in America. While many given examples of racist cops are more complicated and less discriminatory than they first appear, there are some examples of actually bad police officers. But we can’t pretend that that’s the status quo or representative of all, or even most, police officers. To do so is counterproductive and disrespectful to those who risk their lives to keep us safe– including those of us who can’t handle being in the same public area as them. I mean, for crying out loud, the patron was able to complain and the barista able to pass it on without being punished by the exact officers in question.

These people need to check their privilege. Especially on America’s birthday.